Go Team!

Aloha FarmLovers!

So I hear there’s a little football game this Sunday afternoon, and FarmLovers is gonna make it easy for you to feed those cheering guests in your living room! Whether you want to buy freshly-caught fish and grass-fed local beef to whip your favorite recipes, or keep it simple by slicing up veggies for a tasty & healthy crudite served up with delicious ready-to-serve pesto, salsa or hummus,  or maybe set out a platter of pastry and cookies from your favorite market bakers… we are here to serve! And don’t forget to pick up some extra freshly pressed juices or honey slush to create your very own signature Superbowl drink! Let there be nothing revealed at half-time that wasn’t intended! Go team!

When & Where to find us this week:

Hale‘iwa/Thurs/2-6. Pearlridge/Sat/8-Noon. Kaka‘ako/Sat/8-Noon. KailuaTown/ Sun/8:30-Noon. Learn more

At The Markets:

EAT FRESH!

Follow our FarmLovers Pinterest pages, for these and many more recipes using fresh, local ingredients! Click each photo to be directed to recipes.

Mushroom Stuffed Chicken

Kale Detox Salad w/ Pesto

Winter Citrus Tart in a Chocolate Crust

SEE YOU ON THE MARKET AISLES!

Remembering home through Food & Farming

Aloha FarmLovers!

Thanks to YES! Magazine for this article…

Farming Brings Refugees Closer to Home Through Food and Community

They were forced out of their homes by Burmese military violence. Now they’re rebuilding their lives in North Carolina.

Farmers Zar Ree and Lion Wei and their whole family together at the farm. Photo by Chris Fowler/Provided by Transplanting Traditions Community Farm.

Visit the farmers markets in Chapel Hill or Carrboro, North Carolina, and you might meet ethnic Karen farmers from Myanmar (formerly Burma) selling onions, carrots, chard, tomatoes, radishes, and salad greens at their booths.

Piled next to these veggies is other produce that those same farmers grew in their home country: bitter melon, water spinach, Chinese okra, a medicinal cooking herb called gotu kola (Asiatic pennywort), or chin baung ywet, a sour green leafy hibiscus variety also known as roselle, a staple in Burmese cooking. All those foods from the old country were grown alongside domestic crops on a small farm 6 miles outside town.

Just outside of Chapel Hill, 32 ethnic Karen, Chin, and Burmese immigrant families are transforming the 5-acre nonprofit Transplanting Traditions Community Farm into a haven that reminds them of the war-torn homes and farms they were forced to flee. The farmers plant and grow food, receive agricultural training and marketing support from the farm, and sell their produce through a variety of outlets.

It would be simple to call this a “farm business incubator” or a “workforce training program.” But that’s not the whole story. The farmers aren’t just doing it for the money. To make enough to live on, most of the farmers—who speak limited English—have full-time night shift jobs as janitors at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Instead, the focus is less on vocational training—the Karen mostly were farmers in their home country, too—than on happiness and health. keep reading

When & Where to find us this week:

Hale‘iwa/Thurs/2-6. Pearlridge/Sat/8-Noon. Kaka‘ako/Sat/8-Noon. KailuaTown/ Sun/8:30-Noon. Learn more

At The Markets:

EAT FRESH!

Follow our FarmLovers Pinterest pages, for these and many more recipes using fresh, local ingredients! Click each photo to be directed to recipes.

Chicken Cheesesteak Baked Ziti

Winter Pear Salad with Blue Cheese, Walnuts and Pomegranate

Pomegranate Vanilla Skillet Cobbler

SEE YOU ON THE MARKET AISLES!

Winter Citrus Time!

Aloha FarmLovers!

Your Guide to Everyone’s Favorite Winter Citrus: Clementines

Everyone’s favorite citrus seems like the platonic ideal of what a citrus fruit should be: seedless, sweet, easy to peel, and portable. But where did they come from? And what are satsumas, mandarines, and tangerines?

It happens every year: Just as it starts to get cold and gray, the first clementines appear in stores, like neon vitamin-C packets from some higher power that knows we need them. Sour at first, they get sweeter and sweeter throughout the winter, hitting peak flavor during the darkest, worst days of the year.

Clementines are one of the all-time great citrus fruits. But how much do we really know about them?

To understand the clementine, we have to first understand the very strange citrus family. Here in the US, our most common citrus fruits are the orange, the lemon, the lime, and the grapefruit. There are three, possibly four, citrus fruits seen as the ancestors of all the others, and of those four common American fruits, exactly none of them are ancestors.

Continue reading at Modern Farmer!

Local Hero Awards

It’s time for the Edible Hawaiian Islands 10th Annual Local Hero Awards! Click to vote for your favorites… including Farmers’ Market! Mahalo!

When & Where to find us this week:

Hale‘iwa/Thurs/2-6. Pearlridge/Sat/8-Noon. Kaka‘ako/Sat/8-Noon. KailuaTown/ Sun/8:30-Noon. Learn more

At The Markets:

EAT FRESH!

Follow our FarmLovers Pinterest pages, for these and many more recipes using fresh, local ingredients! Click each photo to be directed to recipes.

wild mushroom, fennel, & camembert pot pie

Roasted Asparagus with Bacon and Shallots

Flourless Orange and Almond Cake

SEE YOU ON THE MARKET AISLES!

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