At your service!

Aloha FarmLovers!

How can we make your weekly Farmers’ Market experience more enjoyable? We know you love the open air cafe where you can sit and relax. We know you love the live music serenading you. Obviously you love supporting our local growers and filling your bags with fresh local fruits and veggies. Certainly you enjoy bringing the best flavors to your table and sharing them with family and friends. How can we go the extra mile for you? Need more ideas for creative back-to-school lunch boxes? Maybe fresh ideas for your UH tail-gating parties coming up? Let us know! We are here to serve!

When & Where to find us this week:

Hale‘iwa/Thurs/2-6. Pearlridge/Sat/8-Noon. Kaka‘ako/Sat/8-Noon. KailuaTown/ Sun/8:30-Noon. Learn more

At The Markets:

EAT FRESH!

Follow our FarmLovers Pinterest pages, for these and many more recipes using fresh, local ingredients! Click each photo to be directed to recipes.

Spicy Cauliflower Burgers

Summer Fresh Corn and Zucchini Chowder

Mermaid Lemonade

SEE YOU ON THE MARKET AISLES!

Sustainability & the Global Beauty Industry

Aloha FarmLovers!

Sowing the Seeds of Sustainability Within the Global Beauty Industry

Photography by Aliza Eliazarov

It’s 8 a.m. on a relentlessly sunny July morning at Barefoot Botanicals, a small organic herb farm in rural Pennsylvania. Elderberry plants sway in the breeze, a rooster crows in the distance, and a barn cat scampers onto a vintage Farmall tractor. Things couldn’t get more bucolic if Old MacDonald himself were to show up, but that’s not on today’s agenda.

Instead, Barefoot Botanicals is welcoming some of its most frequent and enthusiastic guests: a handful of beauty execs from L’Oréal, the world’s largest cosmetics company. Instead of the Armani suiting and stiletto heels you might expect, this group sports well-worn jeans, sun-shielding caps, long-sleeved plaid shirts, and closed-toe shoes. In other words, these people look like they’ve been spending some quality time at a farm. Continue reading at Modern Farmer

Visit the Kickstarter page to learn more about this project.

When & Where to find us this week:

Hale‘iwa/Thurs/2-6. Pearlridge/Sat/8-Noon. Kaka‘ako/Sat/8-Noon. KailuaTown/ Sun/8:30-Noon. Learn more

At The Markets:

EAT FRESH!

Follow our FarmLovers Pinterest pages, for these and many more recipes using fresh, local ingredients! Click each photo to be directed to recipes.

CUCUMBER GAZPACHO WITH YOGURT, CILANTRO & CORIANDER

Israeli Couscous Salad With Broccoli, Chickpeas, and Pesto

Watermelon Agua Fresca

SEE YOU ON THE MARKET AISLES!

Stimulating the Food Industry by Saving the Bees

Aloha FarmLovers!

Stimulating the Food Industry by Saving the Bees

Author: Christy Erickson (SavingOurBees.org)

All around the world, large colonies of both domesticated and wild bees have been dying off, so much so, that the food industry and the environment have been feeling the loss. Research has determined that their disappearance is largely due to human-caused actions; the overuse of insecticides, global warming due to CO2 emissions, disease, and loss of habitat have been linked to their fleeting numbers.

Image credit: Maria Godfrida

How are Bees Connected to the Food Industry:

Bees are master pollinators. They pollinate the flowers that produce approximately seventy percent of crops that we love to eat. Foods such as apples, plums, peaches, guavas, pears, mangoes, okra, strawberries, avocados, onions, lima beans, walnuts, cotton, cherries, green beans, flaxseed, alfalfa and much more are all results of bees pollination. Therefore, if the bees go, eventually, these crops would follow. And if the crops don’t grow, the negative chain of events will continue; the food industry would feel tremendous financial loss and the cost of food would go up. Additionally, our health would deteriorate due to loss of nutrition.

Saving the Bees:

Unfortunately, there is no one quick way to save the bees. There is no light switch to turn on that would make the bees magically reappear. Instead, there is a series of things we can do and stop doing that would inspire their triumphant return.

  • Ban chemical use: The most obvious change that needs to be made is to ban the use of harsh chemicals. While it may take some time for the industry to make the switch to bee-friendly alternatives, you can start at home. There is a safer alternative for almost every harsh chemical that you use daily. Ban chemical insecticides, pesticides, hairsprays, bug sprays, air fresheners and cleaners.
  • Advocate for bees: You can advocate for bees by being their voice. Educate the masses on their importance and support causes that actively support their presence.
  • Start a garden: Starting a small garden is a lot easier than you may think. You do not have to have the greenest thumb to be successful. All you need is a site in which to house your garden; this could be a dedicated space in your backyard, pots on your deck or even trays of herbs on your windowsill. You need to choose crops that would flourish based on your location, treat the soil with organic mulch and compost, stimulate with water irrigation and treat with only plant-based pesticides and herbicides. Starting a garden would not only invite bees and other helpful pollinators to your area, but doing so would also help you keep your family and community healthier.
  • Plant some flowers: Dedicate a swatch of your backyard to grow wildflowers in, throw seeds back there and leave the area undisturbed to attract the bees. Also, you can walk around your community and throw seeds in green spaces to inspire flowers to grow.
  • Become a beekeeper: Beekeeping is a rewarding hobby with only positive outcomes; you will be stimulating the honeybee population and generating yummy, nutritious honey and honey by-products. To get started you need to become educated; join your local beekeeper’s coalition, and take in-depth courses on the subject that would help you learn the right equipment to purchase, how to care for the bees and harvest the honey.
  • Support local organic farmers: Supporting local organic farmers is synonymous with supporting the local bee community. Keeping their business alive will, in turn, keep the bees alive. Plus, you get to bask in the good feeling of helping to stimulate the local economy. Visiting a nearby farmers’ market is an excellent way to buy organic, and you might even meet some local beekeepers who can give you tips on gardening and beekeeping in your region.
  • Be Greener: Lessening your carbon footprint means that fewer harmful CO2s will be released into the atmosphere. You can be greener by walking more, washing/drying your clothing less, carpooling and quitting smoking.

For all that bees do for mankind, we owe it to them to help and protect them.

When & Where to find us this week:

Hale‘iwa/Thurs/2-6. Pearlridge/Sat/8-Noon. Kaka‘ako/Sat/8-Noon. KailuaTown/ Sun/8:30-Noon. Learn more

At The Markets:

EAT FRESH!

Follow our FarmLovers Pinterest pages, for these and many more recipes using fresh, local ingredients! Click each photo to be directed to recipes.

sage roasted pork belly

Orecchiette with Swiss Chard, Brown Butter & Walnuts

Salted Almond Butter Cookies

SEE YOU ON THE MARKET AISLES!

Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required

FarmLovers Markets


Explore previous Blog Posts!

Instagram

Ooooh! Persimmons!!
Why yes, thank you: I do need your magic Elixer! @aliicoffeecompany
Come and get 'em!
Who's ready for some freshly pounded paiai?
Good morning, FarmLovers!!
Join @soleildhawaiibakery today at the market!
On the @paninodivinohawaii grill!
Wow!
Tasty!
Followon TwitterSubscribeto RSS Feed