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RECIPES!

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Farmers’ Market News
March 3, 2011 – Vol. 3 Issue 9

Aloha Market Friend!

Market Manager RECIPES!


Alrighty, we are each going to give you a recipe for something we have made recently using market goodies… are you ready? Here we go…


Read more

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Why is Farming Important?

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Farmers’ Market News
February 24, 2011 – Vol. 3 Issue 8

Aloha Market Friend!

NS Greenprint

WHY FARMING IS IMPORTANT IN AMERICA

John Ikerd, Professor Emeritus

University of Missouri, Columbia, MO

I found this great paper online and thought I would share it with you all. Here’s a little taste:

If there is to be a future for farming in America, it must be in a new and different kind of American farm. America simply can’t depend on corporate farming – even if contract farming were made an acceptable way of life, which rarely is the case today. As costs of land and labor in the U.S. continue to rise, as they almost certainly will, multinational corporations will simply move their farming operations to other countries. Strong residential demand for land and good off-farm employment opportunities ultimately will destroy the ability of America to compete in the race “to the bottom” – the race among countries to produce food at the lowest dollar and cent cost. If there is to be a future for farming in America we must create a “new American farm.”

LAST WEEKEND AT THE MARKETS!

delicious fresh produce at the markets

Coast to Coast… we are there for food, fun and community!

Genetic Engineering… A primer

Perhaps you have heard the terms “GMO” or “Genetically Engineered” and don’t quite know what that means. If that is the case, we invite you to take a peak at this article , from Disabled World which gives a little history and lists some of the GE crops currently in the fields.

Roots of Change

roots of change

Check out this article by Martha Cheng in the Honolulu Weekly

about ideas for sustainable food systems.

And join in the discussion:

Resilient Island Food Systems:
Food Security and Climate Change
Tuesday March 1st, 6-7:30
Church of the Crossroads, Weaver Hall

1212 University Avenue
more info

Cancer Prevention Month

A word from the Pesticide Action Network

Every February, Cancer Prevention Month comes and goes without anything being said or done about the many cancer-causing chemicals that surround us.

Let’s make this February different. Partner groups across the country are working together to gather tens of thousands of signatures to deliver to President Obama demanding a national cancer prevention plan. Join this national effort to make true cancer prevention a priority. Sign the petition today

Find us on the internet!
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Come enjoy a full day on the North Shore- start your day at the Market, then stop by one of the many great unique shops in Hale’iwa Town! Head over to the Sugar Mill in Waialua! Go for a Skydive or Surf lesson! Make a day of it on the beautiful North Shore!

Share the wealth and bring a friend…

I ku ka makemake, e hele mai, hele no me ka malo`elo`e.

if the wish to come arises, walk firmly.


a hui hou-

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Hug a Farmer.

Haleiwa and Hawaii Kai logo
Farmers’ Market News
February 16, 2011 – Vol. 3 Issue 7

Aloha Market Friend!

BEGINNING THIS WEEKEND!

portabella and crimini mushrooms

We are thrilled that after nearly two years of prep and planning, we will be joined this weekend (both markets!) by Small Kine Farm… grower of Portabella and Crimini mushrooms! Mushrooms  are full of proteins, vitamins and minerals, amino acids, anti-biotic and anti-oxidants.And it is said that they can aid in weight loss, and increasing immunity. Read more here about the benefits of mushrooms.

Says Farmer Fung Yang: Hawaii Monster Mushrooms from Small Kine Farm are organically grown in Waimanalo using green waste as our growing substrate. The substrate is composted and pasteurized in high heat before being used to provide a nutritious and bacteria-free growing medium for our mushrooms.
Monster Mushroom is the same strain that Portabella and Crimini Mushrooms come from. This harvest is from the very first production run from our farm.

Have You Hugged Your Farmer Today?

Why are family farms important?

Excerpt From SustainableTable. Read entire article here.

  • In addition to producing fresh, nutritious, high-quality foods, small family farms provide a wealth of benefits for their local communities and regions.

  • Perhaps most importantly, family farmers serve as responsible stewards of the land. Unlike industrial agriculture operations, which pollute communities with chemical pesticides, noxious fumes and excess manure, small family farmers live on or near their farms and strive to preserve the surrounding environment for future generations. Since these farmers have a vested interest in their communities, they are more likely to use sustainable farming techniques to protect natural resources and human health.
  • The existence of family farms also guarantees the preservation of green space within the community. Unfortunately, once a family farm is forced out of business, the farmland is often sold for development, and the quality land and soil for farming are lost.
  • Independent family farms also play a vital role in rural economies. In addition to providing jobs to local people, family farmers also help support small businesses by purchasing goods and services within their communities. Meanwhile, industrial agriculture operations employ as few workers as possible and typically purchase supplies, equipment, and building materials from outside the local community.  Rural areas are then left with high rates of unemployment and very little opportunity for economic growth.
  • Finally, family farmers benefit society by boosting democratic values in their communities through active civic participation, and by helping to preserve an essential connection between consumers, their food, and the land upon which this food is produced.

The loss of small family farms has dramatically reduced our supply of safe, fresh, sustainably-grown foods; it has contributed to the economic and social disintegration of rural communities; and it is eliminating an important aspect of our national heritage. If we lose our family farmers, we’ll lose the diversity in our food supply, and what we eat will be dictated to us by a few large corporations. Clearly, family farms are a valuable resource worth preserving.  Now, more than ever, it’s important to realize that family farms are a valuable resource worth preserving.

How can you help a farmer today?

(Beyond the hugging suggestion)

  • Shop at farmers’ markets… and ask a friend to join you!
  • Dine in restaurants that use locally grown produce!
  • Ask your grocer to sell more locally grown fruits and veggies (and thank them for the efforts they have made thus far!)
  • Follow important Ag legislation and have your voice heard in support of the small family farmer.

LAST WEEKEND AT THE MARKETS!

fruit, veggies and fun at the markets!

Coast to Coast… we are there for food, fun and community!

IN THE NEWS

“Vilsack Clears Industrial Biotech Corn”, Des Moines Register, February 11, 2011.

“U.S. Approves Gene-Altered Alfalfa, Fails to Protect Organic Farms”, Rodale News, January 27, 2011.

“USDA Approves Genetically Engineered Sugar Beets Without Ample Review”,  Rodale News, February 4, 2011

“How Ethanol Production Could Make for Crumbly Corn Chips”, The Christian Science Monitor, February 15, 2011.

Click here to tell President Obama that you care about how your food is produced and what it’s in it and that it’s time to put the health and safety of farmers and America’s 50 million organic consumers over corporate profits.

Find us on the internet!
Sponsors new

Come enjoy a full day on the North Shore- start your day at the Market, then stop by one of the many great unique shops in Hale’iwa Town! Head over to the Sugar Mill in Waialua! Go for a Skydive or Surf lesson! Make a day of it on the beautiful North Shore!

Share the wealth and bring a friend…

I ku ka makemake, e hele mai, hele no me ka malo`elo`e.

if the wish to come arises, walk firmly.


a hui hou-

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