Cyrus Sutton’s Island Earth

Aloha FarmLovers!

A Pro Surfer-Filmmaker Casts His Camera on Hawaii’s GMO Debate

Pro surfer and Emmy-winning filmmaker Cyrus Sutton, 34, has spent a lot of time riding waves and making films about surfing and the outdoors. His latest documentary, “Island Earth,” focuses on the land rather than the sea, exploring the many complicated facets of farming in the state of Hawaii—a state that’s rich in fertile soil yet still imports the vast majority of its food.

The 63-minute documentary that took Sutton two and a half years to complete tells the story of Hawaii’s challenges involving GMOs, the food system, and the fight for who gets to determine how the land is used. The film is in part told through the eyes of indigenous scientist Cliff Kapono, who went into biotechnology with the hope of helping Hawaiians but whose beliefs were shaken up by what he saw happening in his home state.

The Hawaiian Islands are blessed with fertile lands, which has made them a prime location for the world’s biggest multinational agrochemical and agricultural biotechnology companies, like Monsanto, Dow, and Pioneer, to test new GMO seed varieties using restricted-use pesticides. Accusations of drifting pesticides adversely affecting residents near the test fields resulted in protests beginning around 2012 that helped spur attempts to legislate GMO use on the various islands. A series of court battles between the ag companies and county governments followed ending in a federal Appeals Court decision this past November that struck down the local laws regulating GMOs.

While large swaths of land on the islands are used for testing seeds, Hawaii relies on imports for as much as 90 percent of its food, an imbalance that’s explored in “Island Earth.” The film also looks at the farmers who have been using regenerative farming techniques, including the practices of their indigenous ancestors, to try and reverse this reliance on outside food sources. Many people, including Sutton, believe these ancient growing practices may hold the key to an alternative, and ultimately better, way of feeding the world’s growing population. Continue reading

When & Where to find us this week:

KaMakanaAli‘i/Wed/3:30-7:30. Hale‘iwa/Thurs/2-7. Pearlridge/Sat/8-Noon. Kaka‘ako/Sat/8-Noon. KailuaTown/ Sun/8:30-Noon. Learn more

At The Markets:

EAT FRESH!

Follow our FarmLovers Pinterest pages, for these and many more recipes using fresh, local ingredients! Click each photo to be directed to recipes.

Monte Cristo Burger with Arla Muenster Sliced Cheese

Zucchini & Ricotta Fritters with Feta, Dill and Lemon

charred pineapple margarita with sage

SEE YOU ON THE MARKET AISLES!

5 DIY gardening Projects

Aloha FarmLovers!

No Yard? No Problem: 5 DIY Garden Projects For People Who Don’t Have Space For A Garden

Gardening can be such a rewarding hobby for you, your family, your neighbors and some friends as well as there is much to benefit from. Aside from being rewarding for your mind and soul, it is also physically rewarding because you actually get to harvest the “fruits of your labor.”

Being able to grow your own food means that you have COMPLETE control over what you are putting into you and your family’s bodies. You get to pick the seeds, the soil and the water that is being used to grow your fruits and veggies. That means completely organic, GMO free, fresh food could be right at your fingertips!

The majority of the produce in your local grocery store has traveled for a long time to get from where it was harvested to your grocery store and then eventually, your kitchen table. Did you know that fresh fruits and vegetables lose many of their nutrients during this traveling process? Not to mention all of the resources that it takes for this food to actually travel to you.

To be able to grow even some of your own fresh fruits and vegetables ensures that you are getting quality, wholesome, nutrient rich food, and you are doing your part for the environment as well.

Now imagine if everyone adopted some of these simple gardening practices, how amazing would that be? This not only brings us one step closer to becoming self-sufficient, but it also will majorly cut down all of the emissions from the big trucks and planes that are transporting this produce. Click here for 5 simple gardening projects for people who don’t have a garden!

When & Where to find us this week:

KaMakanaAli‘i/Wed/3:30-7:30. Hale‘iwa/Thurs/2-7. Pearlridge/Sat/8-Noon. Kaka‘ako/Sat/8-Noon. KailuaTown/ Sun/8:30-Noon. Learn more

At The Markets:

EAT FRESH!

Follow our FarmLovers Pinterest pages, for these and many more recipes using fresh, local ingredients! Click each photo to be directed to recipes.

Portuguese Chicken and Potatoes

Spring Asparagus Salad

Hazelnut Brownies

SEE YOU ON THE MARKET AISLES!

Hemp History Week!

Aloha FarmLovers!

Over half of all U.S. states have lifted the ban on industrial hemp farming at the state level, however federal law still prohibits commercial industrial hemp cultivation due to outdated and inaccurate drug policy. With momentum building across the country, and increasing consumer awareness about the health benefits, economic opportunities, technological innovation and sustainability advantages of industrial hemp —advocates and organizers are eager to see 2017 be the year industrial hemp farming expands across the American agriculture landscape once again.
Hemp is a renewable resource that can help reduce market dependency on wood, oil, and other non-sustainable industrial agriculture practices, thereby contributing to environmentally responsible food and fiber production, forest conservation, reduction in agriculture pesticide use, and soil remediation. Hemp sequesters carbon from the atmosphere, mitigating the rising rate of CO2 levels responsible for climate change; and furthermore, pollinators thrive on the proliferous pollen created by hemp plants. Despite federal progress toward commercial hemp farming since 2014, the hemp industry faces a number of challenges and barriers to full scale farming of industrial hemp, including: inability of hemp farmers to obtain crop insurance and financing, difficulties involved with sourcing certified hemp seed, lack of adequate processing infrastructure in the U.S. for raw hemp materials, barriers to interstate commerce for hemp products, and the regulation of CBD products. To learn more and see how you can help this cause, swing by Kakaako Farmers’ Market on Saturday, and KailuaTown Farmers’ Market on Sunday, and look for the Hemp History Week booth. Learn more here.

When & Where to find us this week:

KaMakanaAli‘i/Wed/3:30-7:30. Hale‘iwa/Thurs/2-7. Pearlridge/Sat/8-Noon. Kaka‘ako/Sat/8-Noon. KailuaTown/ Sun/8:30-Noon. Learn more

At The Markets:

EAT FRESH!

Follow our FarmLovers Pinterest pages, for these and many more recipes using fresh, local ingredients! Click each photo to be directed to recipes.

Simple Coconut Quinoa and Lentil Curry with Lime Mango

a warm salad of roasted turmeric-chili chickpeas + pear | gluten free + vegan

Mint Chocolate Date Nut Bars

SEE YOU ON THE MARKET AISLES!